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Past Event

Saturday University: Gandhi’s Campaign vs Indigo Plantations

Jan 26 2019

Seattle Art Museum

Plestcheeff Auditorium

10 AM – 11:30 AM

The First Satyagraha: Gandhi's Campaign Against Indigo Plantations in Early 20th-Century India
Anand Yang, University of Washington

A high demand for indigo dyes in Europe led British planters in northeastern India (Bengal) to force peasants to grow indigo on part of their land. With almost no compensation, the peasants suffered from food shortages and violence. In this talk held on India’s Republic Day, Anand Yang discusses how Gandhi’s 1917 involvement in the indigo growing area of Champaran (in current Bihar state) led to his first civil disobedience campaign, or satyagraha, in the struggle for India’s independence.

About the Presenter

Anand Yang is Professor and Chair of the Department of History, University of Washington. His early scholarship dealt with peasants and agrarian societies under British colonial rule. He currently writes on comparative and world history relating to labor and migration, and India-China relations.

Please note: South Hall doors open at 9:30 AM.

OTHER LECTURES IN THIS SERIES

JAN 19

The Harmonic Forest: Musical Structures Heard as Trees

JAN 26

The First Satyagraha: Gandhi's Campaign Against Indigo Plantations in Early 20th-Century India

FEB 2

The Story of the Camellia

FEB 9

Soybean Worlds

FEB 16

Jute and Peasant Life in the Bengal Delta

MAR 2

Durian and Landscape Change in West Kalimantan, Indonesia

MAR 9

The Japanese Basket 1845–1958: Mirror of Modernity

QUESTIONS? CONTACT US

206.442.8480 [email protected]

Full series tickets: $73; SAM members $39
SAVE: winter and spring series: $120; SAM members $62
Individual lecture tickets available at the door: $11, SAM members $6; free at the door for students with ID
Please arrive to your seat 10 minutes before the program starts, or your seat may be released.

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